The gamification of writing support in non-Anglophone contexts: a practice model using the characteristics of video game design

  • Shaana A. Aljoe The University of Bolton School of Education Deane Rd, Bolton BL3 5AB
Keywords: English-medium higher education, writing support, EAP, ESL, gamification

Abstract

Writing support facilities are becoming commonplace at English-medium universities globally. However, writing support units located outside of English-speaking contexts are for the most part perceived by some international students as centres for English language remediation and exist to serve the needs of students who are academically challenged. It is therefore a writing support tutor’s mission to encourage students to view writing support as support for all students, as would be the case in an English-speaking context where these facilities are considered an integral part of colleges and universities. This report encourages the use of video game design characteristics by writing support tutors to introduce students to the writing process and highlights issues that writing tutors in non-Anglophone contexts should be aware of when advertising the services of the writing support facility and in face-to-face discussions with individual students. The proposed practice model should be viable for use at similar institutions of higher education located within and outside of English-speaking contexts.

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Published
2017-10-22
How to Cite
Aljoe, S. A. (2017). The gamification of writing support in non-Anglophone contexts: a practice model using the characteristics of video game design. Edutainment, 1(1). Retrieved from https://eutainment.e-journals.pl/index.php/EDUT/article/view/10.15503.edut.2016.1.109.114
Section
Practice